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Good idea?
Yes
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Yes but number 2
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bohemian
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Fri Mar 30, 2018 8:07 pm
So I stumbled across this little gem. >.>

https://outrider.org/nuclear-weapons/interactive/bomb-blast
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Fri Mar 30, 2018 8:49 pm
That's very interesting. I thought the effects would be worse though. I tried it for where I lived, and there would be 30,000 fatalities, and 89,000 injuries. Then I tried it where I grew up. There would be 500 fatalities, and 1,000 injuries. Shocked Of course half of that would probably be cows. *snickers* I rounded the numbers.
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Sat Mar 31, 2018 6:16 pm
That is interesting.
In my city, there would be 42,877 fatalities, and 68,949 injuries. But, if there was a blast in the major city, my current location wouldn't be hit at all. Huh.
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bohemian
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Sun Apr 01, 2018 8:10 am
I thought it was interesting that I post the question I did...and that came up while random news trolling. XD
And you can change the bomb type as well. If the Czar bomb were to hit Sydney (has the biggest payload), I still wouldn't be affected, but I would be getting the hell out of dodge regardless. Yes

But in regards to my question...I think there is a lot of strutting and puffing of feathers, much like the Cold War. "Oh, you are going to put your nuclear bunkers here? Well, guess I am going to put mine here to better reach you as well."

We are being conditioned to look towards the Middle East as the cause of all the problems (and in some cases, it is a big problem with all the fighting), the idiotic mass immigration to Germany (I can't believe that woman managed to form another government, don't they have term limits?), however while the rest of the world is looking towards Europe, Russia, the Middle East, the Far East, we aren't paying as much attention to what is happening in the USA (to be quite honest, I don't see much of Central and South America, unless it is drug or football/soccer related).
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Tue May 22, 2018 3:21 pm
bohemian wrote:
We are being conditioned to look towards the Middle East


Well I think there's a good reason for that though. A certain group of them have made it their life's mission to destroy anyone who is not like them.




bohemian wrote:
we aren't paying as much attention to what is happening in the USA


I'm actually relieved to hear you say that. Sometimes I think we are all anyone talks about, and that we are being judged constantly. XD





Bo do you have a new question that we can be opinionated about? XD
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Wed May 23, 2018 1:26 am
Yes I do have another question, I have noticed a few things lately (well, the past couple of years), and I think it should be discussed and I know that some people might get a little bit passionate about the topic.

So, Santa Fe was the latest place in America to be affected by a shooting that affects more than just the shooter. I have noticed recently, from a Canadian no less, that there is an increase in idiotic politicians basically burying their heads in the sand about gun violence. Now, do you believe the USA should have stricter rules and regulations when it comes to being able to purchase guns, OR, do you think that there needs to be more education on mental health....or both?

Also, this was the first article that popped up when I googled school shootings america 2018 https://edition.cnn.com/2018/03/02/us/school-shootings-2018-list-trnd/index.html
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Scarz
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Wed May 23, 2018 2:43 am
(apologizing in advance for the wall of text)

Lady bo, the biggest difference between the USA and most other countries is our 2nd Amendment (the right to bear arms). . .

but to answer your question, many times the biggest problem is that there are laws on the books that are not being enforced. . .in the case of the Church shooter, he was dishonorably discharge from the military and had a history of spousal abuse, but the military did not report it to the Feds so when he purchased his weapon the background check was clear. . .it took a former NRA instructor to take him down.

The Sandy Hook shooter had mental issues, yet his mom kept several weapons in the house, which made no sense. If she kept them locked up, he either had a key or knew the combination to the safe and took them after killing her.

The Parkland shooter showed many signs of problems, was reported to the FBI twice and they never followed up. There were also reports of both the sheriff's office and social services going to his home to investigate problems and no one did anything. . .any of those should have been reported and would have kept him from "legally" buying his guns. . .the worst thing is one of the"speakers" for the kids there, Emma Gonzales, admitted that she bullied him, this is not an excuse for what he did, but I find it strange that she is a hero for speaking out and trying to ban guns, yet she was a part of the problem. . .

This latest shooter has also claimed to have been bullied and he didn't purchase the guns, his father did. It hasn't been determined how the shooter got the guns, but it sounds like the father did not have them locked in a gun safe. . .

In the Florida case, there is a law on the book, the Baker Act, that would have allowed law enforcement to remove his guns and ammunition until after he was held for mental examination for at least 72 hours (they never did).

The majority of these cases there were warning signs. . .youtube, Facebook, etc. posts. . .this newest one, they ignored his wearing a trench coat (even when it was 90 degrees) which is what the Columbine shooters wore, except his had an iron cross, a hammer and sickle, Japanese Imperial flag, symbols of satanism. . .all of which should have at least drawn some attention.

You have those who say that if they didn't have access guns this wouldn't have happened. . .maybe, but guns can also be purchased illegaly. In Chicago, they have some of the strictest gun laws in the country, yet over 600 have been shot and 178 have been killed so far this year.

The Florida Baker Act is a good start on checking out possible mental illness, but it has to actually be used to do any good. We already have background checks and there is a lie about a "gun show loophole" that suggest you can buy a gun at a gun show without a background check. . .it is a lie, you cannot purchase any weapon at a gun show without a background check, unless you buy something illegally out of the trunk of a car. . .if the gun show operator were to see it, they would call the police as purchases like that would close the gun show.

As to what can be done to stop these shootings from happening, it has been suggested that you only have one point of entry into a school with metal detectors and armed security, to me the biggest problem with that is that now you have moved the kids from being targets in their classrooms, to being targets while standing in line to get in.

Many of our schools have multiple classroom buildings, you would need something at each one. . .

Arming teachers and training them is already being done in some States and having armed security is also being done, in fact an armed security officer stopped a shooting at an Illinois school (but very few news outlets even mentioned it).

We already have background checks for purchasing and in most States an 18 year old can purchase a rifle and 21 to purchase a pistol. Changing the rifle age to 21 may help, but many "kids" do go hunting with their Family even younger than 18.

I would not be opposed to having some sort of training prior to the purchase going through (through gun shops, firing ranges, the NRA, etc.) unless someone has served in the military.

There has to be something like the Baker Act available if someone is showing indications of possible mental illness to include anything found on social media (threats, pics with multiple guns, anything that would not be considered normal).

Florida showed that everyone from the FBI to the Sheriff's Department to Social Services never took the threat seriously. . .they have to take any report seriously or why would anyone even bother to report them.

I agree that we should ban bump-stocks (as used in the Vegas shooting), they serve no real purpose.

As I said earlier, we need to enforce the laws on the books, but we have to realize that if someone really has evil in their hearts they will find a way by either buying a firearm illegally, or using some other means (Pipe bombs, cars, knives, baseball bat).

But mostly everyone needs to be vigilant. If something seems out of the ordinary (like a trench coat in 90 degree weather) or someone having violent outbursts. . .report it!

I do not believe in confiscation of law-abiding peoples' guns as many on the far Left do. . .but a real dialogue is needed, not knee-jerk reactions!

The premise of the CNN article is slightly misleading, it used the following parameters:

A shooting that involved at least one person being shot (not including the shooter)
A shooting that occurred on school grounds
We included grades K through college/university level
We included gang violence, fights and domestic violence
We included accidental discharge of a firearm as long as the first two parameters are met

All shootings on a school ground do not necessarily have anything to do with school. . .just like using gang violence, fights and domestic violence. . .just because something happened on a school ground doesn't make it a school shooting. . but then again, if they didn't use their "parameters", it wouldn't have been as dramatic as saying "more than 1 a week." and wouldn't have fit their narrative. They included shootings in school parking lots and even one where someone was shot with a BB gun. . .this is not to lessen the actual shootings, but it is to pad the anti-gun rhetoric.

Nothing I have said here is meant to offend anyone, it is just my thoughts.




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Wed May 23, 2018 8:03 pm
I have to give Sir Scarz a big pat on the back for all of his knowledge and research. It is very impressive. I am an opinionated person, but I am a lazy opinionated person. XD I use what knowledge, common sense, and experience I have to form my opinions. I don't do any research to back it up unless absolutely necessary. XD



I'm having a rough day so I will come back later to write what I have to say about this question. I just don't have the brain power at the moment to sufficiently address it. If no one else has responded to this I will just edit this post.
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bohemian
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Thu May 24, 2018 12:07 am
That is a MASSIVE wall of text Sir Scarz, and it's ok. It's better than ok, it's great because I get to be educated on something I don't really understand. Like I said, it's a topic that I think a lot of Americans at least, feel passionate about. I'm just an outsider looking in in this case. While I don't agree completely with guns for, say personal use (like assault rifles and other high powered rifles), I do agree with them for sportsmen/women, police officers, the defense forces, farmers, hunters etc.

We can have guns in Australia, but as far as I know, they need to be in a lock-box? and the only person allowed to access said gun is the person who a) has the gun licence, and b) is the registered owner of said gun. That includes handguns and rifles. But then again, after Port Arthur in the late 90's, we brought in some pretty strict gun laws. Which get enforced. And there is also a weapons armistice, either every year, or every few months. I honestly don't pay much attention due to not...needing a gun.

But when it comes to mental health issues, there are some serious problems that need to be dealt with first. Every day we are understanding more and more about how the brain works and how mental health isn't just one issue, it is multiple issues that, unfortunately in some (most) places, is still highly taboo. ESPECIALLY with men.
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WishingMoon
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Thu May 24, 2018 1:43 am
I'm going to add a few things without actually answering the question because I don't feel I can.

I work at a school. I was working at a school a few months before it had a school shooting. It is on my mind.

Scarz brings up a great point about multiple buildings at schools. I, as an art teacher, have my own building with 3 rooms. Just today I had a problem were my door wasn't locking when closed, like it was designed to do, so kids kept getting into the building while I was not there. With so much furniture (a disgusting amount really) and so many cabinets it could so easy turned into a **** **** show. What if someone did get into one of the side rooms and stayed there? A lot of US schools are easily 50 years old and things get run down. My door has had a work order for repair for at least 6 months.

I would also say I would quit if they told me I had to have a gun. I wouldn't work as a teacher. Not because of a personal gun belief, just the logistics (but also a personal belief). I only see two real options, it being on my person at all times or it being locked up. On my person would be a mess just because of how active my classroom is paired with who my kids are. I've had kids grab at my necklaces. I've had them try and pull things out of my hand. I bump into things or get caught on things trying to move around. That wouldn't be safe. The second one is safer but if you think I can direct my students to safety, lock down a room, and grab a gun from a locked safe, all with an active shooter and no mistakes you have a lot of faith in my abilities.

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Scarz
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Thu May 24, 2018 2:16 am
I think no teacher should be forced to carry a gun, but I can see it as an option if and only if the teacher is trained and comfortable doing so.

I saw where one school district in Pennsylvania wants to put a bucket of rocks in each class room so they would be available for the students to throw at a shooter. . .that one doesn't make much sense to me at all.

As to gun control and outlawing certain kinds of guns, I do not agree, mainly because too many people who want to do so do not have a clue what they are talking about. I even saw a retired General (after the Parkland shooting) talking about firing an AR15 on "full" semi-automatic. . .there is no such thing as "full" semi-automatic.

Many who want to ban guns think an AR-15 is an "assault rifle", actually the AR stands for armalite rifle and even though to some it looks scary, it is nothing but a semi-automatic rifle. a real "assault rifle" has the capability of firing full automatic, like a machine gun. . .those guns are available in this country, but you need a special license to own one.

People talk about AR's and AK's and school shootings but the worst school shooting was carried out with two pistols. The Virginia Tech shooter killed 32 with two 9 mm pistols.

There is a stigma attached to mental health problems and it is hard trying to determine if someone is having psychological problems, but there at least should be a way, if someone is exhibiting certain behaviors, posting crazy things and the like, the school or authorities should be able to have the person checked out, for their own good. Unfortunately it is almost impossible to do so.

We protect our banks, our government buildings, etc., better than we protect our schools, there is definitely something wrong with that picture.

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Thu May 24, 2018 4:09 pm
I don't think teachers should be armed just to protect students, and by extension, themselves. Unless it is with one of those bean bag guns...but I can already picture certain teachers misusing them.

I was just pondering a thought in regards to mental health. It comes back to something I watched in NCIS back in season 1 or 2. Perhaps these shooters are looking to end their life, but don't have the "courage" to do the deed themselves, and so they go on a shooting spree in a bid for suicide by the police. But when it comes down to it, either they do something to ensure that they get killed, either finally pulling the trigger themselves or prompting the police to do it for them, or someone talks them down and they then continue to live, but an extremely different life from before. And depending on what state they live in, either life in prison or the death penalty, which could be in turn,changed to life. But again, I am thinking and speaking as an outsider looking in.
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Scarz
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Thu May 24, 2018 7:29 pm
I am not sure the beanbag thing would work any better the the bucket of rocks, the launcher they use for them is a bit cumbersome and if you miss it might have more deadly consequences.

Many of these shooters go into it looking for either "suicide by cop" or committing suicide by shooting themselves. The Sante Fe shooter said he was going to shoot himself, but when it came down to it, he chickened out and surrendered.

The State laws are different, some have "Life without Parole" and others have the "death penalty". . .if the Federal government steps in to prosecute, they can go for the 'death penalty' no matter what State the shooting took place in.


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Thu May 24, 2018 8:30 pm
Scarz wrote:
I saw where one school district in Pennsylvania wants to put a bucket of rocks in each class room so they would be available for the students to throw at a shooter. . .that one doesn't make much sense to me at all.




I can see how you would feel that way, but I think that is designed to distract the shooter and throw them off balance. Perhaps even to give someone an opportunity to try to take him down. I think it's better than nothing, and it shows a willingness to get involved and to try to save lives. Even a small action might make a difference. However, I don't feel that kids should be forced to defend themselves, and it's very sad that putting rocks in a classroom is even a thing.

During 9/11 a plane was taken down with a box cutter. I know everyone was scared, but that should never have happened. It's hard to know during these situations when you should keep quiet and still, and when you should take action. They usually advise you to not try to be a hero, but in some cases, if you want to have a chance at all, someone needs to do something. During a robbery it probably is best to just stay still and quiet. They are after the money, and are rarely trying to hurt anyone unless they get in the way. Terrorism and school shootings are different. The sole purpose of the people who commit these tragedies is to kill as many people as possible. I think it is perfectly understandable if someone wants to just try to hide, but we should commend those that try to save lives if they are brave enough to do so. In some instances there is nothing to be lost by at least trying.




Moon-That is awful. They should fix the doors at your school. I remember only having one door to go in at my son's school. It was a small school so perhaps it was easier to keep the situation under control, but his school was definitely trying to prevent anything from happening. For one thing, there are other situations besides school shootings to be careful of. Kidnappings are a very real worry. Non-custodial parents frequently try to take their children when they do not have a right to do so.





Sorry in advance for the huge wall of text, but this is an important subject. It is a personal subject for me in many regards.





Bo-To answer your question, I'm not sure more gun laws are the answer. We should definitely enforce the ones we have, and as Sir Scarz pointed out, quit dropping the ball. The problem is that individuals often do not want to get involved, or take time out of their busy day to report suspicious activity. When they do actually report it, is law enforcement going to do their job and investigate? Maybe. As Sir Scarz pointed out, the FBI dropped the ball on the Parkland shooter.

Most humans are lazy, irresponsible, and are only concerned with things that directly affect them. Everywhere I worked 90% of my co-workers were like that. If I saw a piece of paper on the ground I would stop and throw it away because it was the right thing to do. If a customer needed help I always followed through because it was the right thing to do. My co-workers would walk right past that piece of paper. My co-workers would forget all about that customer.

I'm sure most of you have waited on a phone call about something important, but the phone call never came because someone didn't do their job. Then you had to call and follow up yourselves. The same thing is happening here, but the problem is, this isn't a piece of paper on the floor. This is people's lives we're talking about, and we can't let anything slip through the cracks. Someone needs to care enough to do their job.


I also think that mental health needs to be addressed period. Not just in regards to school shootings. We have a whole lot of very ill people just walking around out in society. Some are dangerous, others are not, but they all need more help than they are getting.

There are hardly any facilities left that will house the mentally ill. Most were closed down due to horrible conditions, and the abuse and neglect of the patients that lived there. Many of them have nowhere to go so they live on the streets. My son is one of them. I can't tell you how many times he's been in a mental hospital. They usually only keep patients 2 days-2 weeks. Then they are released to fend for themselves, or put back with families that don't have a clue what to do with them. Said families are often forced to endure abuse from the mentally ill family member.

The medicines we have are often not effective, and that's if you can even get them to take their medicine. My son now refuses treatment. Some don't have insurance to get medicine even if they wanted to. It's an epidemic.



We also need to address the way people treat each other. You can't bully someone their whole lives, or treat them like they're invisible, and not expect there to be consequences for that. Most people will not snap and do something really bad, but there will be some kind of consequence. Just making the bullied person miserable, and making them contemplate taking their own life is bad enough.

So many people do not follow the golden rule. Treat others as you would want to be treated. No one likes to be bullied or ignored, but it happens every day. We are starting to see some real consequences in the U.S. regarding our social structure, and how we treat one another. School shootings, race relations, police relations, divorce, abuse, animal abuse, etc. The list goes on and on. The first three examples being the most heavily publicized, but all being a symptom of the same problem. Not enough good people, or at least not enough good people willing to do the right thing. I think in this high-tech age we're starting to feel disconnected from each other, and we're not always seeing others as truly human. That makes it easier for someone with severe mental issues, or a lack of conscious, to commit something like this. Just like how internet trolls find it so easy to be nasty to people they are not face to face with.

Our society is in trouble. We need to have some serious conversations about how to fix things, but everyone feels they have to be politically correct now. We can't say too much for fear we'll offend someone. Nothing gets fixed when you tip toe around difficult subjects.



It's probably a little hard for someone not from the U.S. to fully understand why so many here believe so strongly in the Second Amendment, but I am glad that there is a willingness to understand.

My Dad taught me the importance of our Constitution and the Second Amendment. He told me that our forefathers wanted to break away from an oppressive, tyrannical government. They came to a new land, where they eventually fought for their freedom, and guns were a part of what made that possible. They also needed guns for self-defense because their new land held many dangers, and everyone has a right to defend themselves. Our forefathers put the Second Amendment into the Constitution to ensure that we would always have a way to defend ourselves from any threat, and so that we would never have to worry about being oppressed again.

Not everyone that owns a gun is a monster. For my Dad it is mostly a hobby. He owns some very lovely pieces that have intricate designs carved into the wood, and when I was little I enjoyed the times that he would let me look at the carvings. I grew up in a time before you were told to keep your guns locked up, and not loaded. It was not uncommon in my house for there to be a loaded gun in the corner of a room. I was told not to touch them unless Dad said it was ok, and I knew better than to touch them. I did not know that I wasn't supposed to touch his reloading stuff. Hobbyists often reload their own bullets. I suppose it's fun for them, and I'm assuming cheaper than buying brand new ones. I think I was around 7 years old when he caught me playing with his gunpowder and scales, and he said that I could have blown him up. That scared me, and I never touched any of that stuff again.

My family did have lessons to learn though. I was a good, well-behaved child. My brother was not. When I was 17, and my brother was 6, we nearly had a family tragedy. My brother found one of my Great-Grandfather's old shot guns. It was not loaded, but my brother just happened to find some shot guns shells. He also just happened to pick one that would work with that shot gun.

The loud bang woke me up from my nap, and I ran to find out what happened. I found my brother holding the shot gun, and he was white as a ghost. The only thing he could say was, "I saw fire." He was not physically harmed, but the floor, and the old typewriter sitting there, had a hole blown through them.

By that time my Mom had gotten there, and I told her what had happened. She immediately called my Dad at work, and told him he was to come home right away after stopping to buy a gun cabinet. Of course Dad did as he was instructed due to the serious nature of what had happened.

He apologized to everyone, and said that he had no idea that Great-Grandpa's gun even still worked. In his defense it was a pretty crusty looking object. Dad was surprised that my brother happened to pick the right ammunition, and load it correctly. He said that since the gun had not been fired in forever, it was no wonder that my brother saw fire come out when the gun was discharged.

Dad kept everything locked up after that until we were all old enough to know better. Dad is human, and he made a mistake. I know my Dad, and he's a good man. He would never purposely allow one of his kids to get hurt. I think he thought my brother knew better like I did. The key to safety is training and precaution. Luckily my family learned that lesson before it was too late.


Several years later when my son was about 8 or 9 years old I got a call from the school. I was to pick him up immediately because he had made threats. He was in the 3rd grade at the time. I had trouble with him his whole life, but when he started school it was a new brand of misery for me. I had the only child I knew that was in the principal's office constantly in Kindergarten. I had him seeing psychiatrists and therapists ever since he was 4. We tried every medicine, reward, discipline, and tactic that we could think of to get him straightened out. Nothing worked.

Back to that day, I went to the school, and they informed me that he had threatened his teacher and her family's lives. They said that he could not come back to school without a doctor's letter stating that he was not a danger to anyone. I was angry. I was angry at my son for putting us in this predicament, and I was angry at the school for actually thinking that an 8 year old could carry out such threats. Don't get me wrong. I understand that it's better safe than sorry, and they were probably correct in their demands. I was just a worn out, working, single mother who was struggling to survive.

I took my son to a mental hospital, but they would not keep and evaluate him. They briefly talked to him and said that he was not a current danger to himself, or others, so there was no need to keep him there. However, they wouldn't write a letter stating that he wasn't a danger either.

At that particular time he was in between therapists so I took him to a psychologist that my family had used before. She talked to my son, listened to what I had to say, and she said she felt comfortable writing a letter so that he could go back to school. I guess she was right. He never made those particular threats again, and of course never acted on them.

His teacher was a lovely lady who never treated my son any worse because of the threats he made. I wouldn't have blamed her if she had. I thanked her many times for her kindness and compassion. My son was troubled, and he still is, but his threats turned out to be empty.

I have learned that there are levels to everything, and that includes mental illness. Just because you have some issues with mental illness doesn't make you crazy. Your average person who has OCD, anxiety, or depression would never dream of carrying out some atrocity. Even after my experiences I'm comfortable with someone owning a gun. I am ok with someone who has a few personal issues owning a gun. I am not ok with people like my son, or worse, owning one. It's one thing to get some help from a psychiatrist, or a therapist, for personal issues. It's a whole other thing if you're ill enough to be in and out of mental hospitals, and you have made threats to yourself and others. The line has to be drawn somewhere.

The only problem is in so many cases when the friends and family of the person who committed a horrible crime are interviewed, they say that they had no idea that the person was capable of that.

The bottom line is that we can't stop all accidents and tragedies from happening. Bad things have happened since the beginning of time. We can do as much as possible to prevent them, and make it better though.

I don't know what the answer is, but banning all guns isn't it. It's not fair to punish the many because of the sins of the few. There are many out there that would like to see your average American defenseless.

We have to get down to the why, and not so much the how. Until we fix the reason why these things are happening, any weapon could be used. Although I will admit is would be a lot harder to carry out with a fork. We do need to figure something out because these kids deserve to go to school without having to worry about being killed.






I do think sometimes it is an issue of them wanting to commit suicide, but not having the courage. But I think more often than not, if you're willing to make that many people suffer, you wanted that many people to suffer. I can never imagine a scenario where I wanted to die so badly that I would be willing to take anyone else with me. That is a separate, worse, kind of sickness coming from a really bitter person in my opinion.
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Fri May 25, 2018 12:18 am
I can see where the rocks could be used to distract a shooter, but unless there is a bucket of rocks at each desk, the kids would have to rush to where the rocks are, when seconds count.

The best advice the experts give are that in such a situation you have 3 options, Run, Hide or Attack. . .each person needs to decide which option is best for them.

In each event, there has been someone who has done each of those, including some that made the ultimate sacrifice so that others could escape.

Another problem seems that we, the USA have an over-prescribing drug problem; so many kids are on ADHD drugs of one kind or another and many think those drugs could be a part of the problem.


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